AirBnB to release its NYC data by appointment only


(Noel Hidalgo) #1

The new data set released on Tuesday, which is made available only by making an appointment to visit Airbnb’s New York City office.
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/02/technology/airbnb-releases-trove-of-new-york-city-home-sharing-data.html

Open data’nauts, it appears that AirBNB is claiming to release its data but you will have to make an appointment. We would love to host the data on data.beta.nyc.

If you happen to get access to the data, please contact @jqnatividad @h2oboxer or I and we’ll get it up on data.beta.nyc.

PS - On twitter, there is a growing conversation on who wants access to the data.


(Joel Natividad) #2

Would be interesting to see how it compares with insideairbnb.com data cc @murray
https://twitter.com/jqnatividad/status/671780478551236608


(Joel Natividad) #3

AirBnB should just release the data. It will inevitably be generally available anyway… kinda reminds me of their San Francisco ad campaign…


(Noel Hidalgo) #4

From this morning’s clips.

AIRBNB PITCHES TRANSPARENCY - POLITICO New York’s Dana Rubinstein and Sally Goldenberg: Tuesday was transparency day for Airbnb. New York reporters were invited to look at Airbnb data on an Excel spreadsheet in a shared workspace near Union Square. Councilmembers will have access to the information, too, according to the company.Chris Lehane, the controversial home-rental site’s head of global policy and public affairs, sat down with reporters for on-the-record interviews.

“This is a caliber and quality of data we haven’t put out anywhere,” Lehane said. The picture Airbnb painted of it itself, using the numbers it provided on Tuesday, was flattering. Nearly 80 percent of Airbnb hosts ‘earn low, moderate, or middle incomes,’ the memo reads. For two-person households, the company defines low-income as up to $53,768, moderate-income as up to $80,653, and middle-income households as up to $134,422. Of the under 36,000 listings in New York City, most are in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens.

“Councilwoman Helen Rosenthal, who’s sponsoring legislation that would increase penalties on some Airbnb hosts, doesn’t think the data is much to look at, anyway, since it doesn’t include addresses. By her analysis, the data showed ‘20,000 of the 36,000 rentals are blatantly illegal.’ Rosenthal’s office added that her 20,000 number was an educated guess based on prior data scraping.” http://politi.co/1TjejJN


(Noel Hidalgo) #5

@IQuantNY posted this lovely clip from the Daily News. Here’s the best quote…

Reporters could read data on this sheet and that and — oh, thank you, so much, Mr. Chris Lehane, political operative turned Airbnb official — they could even take notes


(Mheadd) #6

(Joel Natividad) #7

I think we should coin a term for this faux transparency - “translucentness” - shameless rip-off of Stephen Colbert’s truthiness.

http://www.cc.com/video-clips/63ite2/the-colbert-report-the-word---truthiness


(Noel Hidalgo) #8

I love Gothamist’s take on the data.

The data, which can be inspected if you make an appointment at Airbnb’s New York City offices, states that 55% of Airbnb’s users are renting out their entire apartments while they’re gone, rather than a single room when they’re present, which for most residents against the law.


(David Moore - PPF) #9

Our non-profit NYC Councilmatic is live, for tracking and understanding everything in the NYC Council.

Check the three main NYC Council Intros in this legislative initiative, linked on my PPF Blog post today.

Fellow BetaNYC’ers, post comments there - e.g. on CM Rosenthal’s bill, Intro 826- and we’ll feature them this month as part of a verified public comment program with “verified” Council offices and community groups.

More about where we’re headed, e.g. for keyword & issue alerts (over email & SMS & social media) for agenda items in city council committee hearings - questions & feedback welcome, more to come this month. Ping me anytime, I’m david at ppolitics.org, or davidmooreppf on Skype chat.

Just a suggestion, the BetaNYC community could collaboratively draft legislation to set standards for how this requested rental data from AirBNB and other services is released, with what fields included (e.g. addresses, what watchdogs need) - and deliver it to supportive council offices to introduce for a formal hearing in the Housing Committee.


(Joel Natividad) #10

@drm, I realize that the comments are best left on Councilmatic, but adding generic Discourse onebox support here just the same :smile:

That is, pasting a link from councilmatic on its own line shows an expanded synopsis, e.g.

pasting http://nyc.councilmatic.org/legislation/int-847-2015/?view=comments shows the generic onebox template.

With extended oneboxing support, we can even get more info like what you get with GitHub, e.g.

https://github.com/datamade/nyc-councilmatic/issues/131 in its own line, results in:
https://github.com/datamade/nyc-councilmatic/issues/131

Or twitter:
https://twitter.com/ppolitics/status/672127847797039104 on its own line results in
https://twitter.com/ppolitics/status/672127847797039104


(Noel Hidalgo) #11

Here is another interesting article from Gawker’s Data News team.

BTW - GAWKER HAS A DATA NEWS TEAM!


(Noel Hidalgo) #12

a review of the data by The Verge found that Airbnb’s numbers, covering November of 2014 through November 1st of 2015, largely confirmed the attorney general’s accusations. A small number of hosts renting out multiple listings took home a disproportionate amount of the total revenue. And while roughly 71 percent of hosts rented out their home for three months or less, there were still thousands of “whole units,” meaning an entire house or apartment, which were rented for six months or more during the last year.